Archive for the ‘Therapeutic Classification’ Category

Exenatide Capsule Gleans Patent in Israel

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

Exenatide AcetateKnown as the brand name Byetta in the United States, which is marketed by AstraZeneca, Exenatide is a GLP-1 analog that is currently offered as an injectable treatment for type 2 diabetes. In mid-January 2015 Oramed Pharmaceuticals was granted a patent in Israel for the oral administration of Exenatide. As an effectual therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes, the advent of this Exenatide capsule is exciting for both patients and practitioners. Exenatide works by producing insulin release at increased glucose levels, which creates a feeling of satiety in patients, subsequently causing a reduction in food intake. This extra bonus of eliciting a reduction in dietary consumption makes Exenatide an ideal treatment for weight loss and weight control, as well as for insulin control. The injectable form of Exenatide has been helpful for patients, but challenging in terms of medication adherence. Many patients dislike using an injectable form of medication daily, so the novel Exenatide capsule is sure to create an optimal form of administration.

Exenatide is also being examined as a potential therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease. In May 2014 a “Proof of Concept” trial was shared from the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience at the UCL Institute of Neurology in London. Basing patient results on a year’s worth of sound data from patients with Parkinson’s disease who had been administered Exenatide for a full year (May 2013-May 2014), an analysis of data showed noteworthy improvements in patients who received Exenatide. Researchers involved in this study cite the neuroprotective benefits of Exenatide, particularly for neuroplasticity. The side effect profile of Exenatide is also a plus for patients, with a small minority of trial participants experiencing mild nausea. The aforementioned study involved 44 patients with moderate to severe Parkinson’s disease. Approximately 20 of the patients received Exenatide in addition to their usual best in care treatment program, and 24 patients were given the placebo alongside best in care therapy. At the one year mark significantly clinical differences were apparent between the groups, with meaningful motor and cognitive differences gleaned from the patients group who received Exenatide. Even at the 14 month mark, when patients who had received Exenatide were taking a holiday from this medication the differences were still widely apparent between both the groups. Researchers utilized the Mattis Dementia Rating scale, as well as a blinded MDS-UPDRS motor subscale evaluation for the patients. The participants who were administered Exenatide had advantages of 5.6 on the blinded MDS-UPDRS motor subscale and 5.3 points on the Mattis Dementia Rating scale as compared to the placebo group. This information is hopeful for the future use of Exenatide for the treatment of not only type 2 diabetes, but also potentially for patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Whether it is injectable or oral Exenatide, LGM Pharma is available to assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the Exenatide CAS# 141758-74-9 API or the Exenatide Acetate CAS# 141732-76-5 API for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e) +A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.

Caspofungin Therapy Aids Leukemia Patients with Invasive Fungal Disease

Friday, June 12th, 2015

caspofunginExciting news was shared in the January 2015 issue of Mycoses, with clinical data revealing that the use of Caspofungin to treat invasive fungal disease in leukemia patients was both positive and responsive. Adult patients who were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia attained relief from their suspected fungal disease after the clinical use of Caspofungin. As an effectual member of the echinocandin drug class Caspofungin is often used in patients who have not responded to prior antifungal treatments. Caspofungin has, however, proved to be widely effective for treating an array of serious fungal infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients such as the patient population aforementioned. The administration of Caspofungin is done intravenously, with a typical dosage being dispensed slowly over a one hour period. Side effects can sometimes include nausea, diarrhea, and headache and skin flushing.

The risk of invasive and life-threatening fungal disease is specifically common in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This patient group will be at a greater risk for this virulent fungal disease typically after either a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Data gleaned from the study shared in Mycoses showed that when patients with ALL who received Caspofungin empirically attained treatment that was deemed therapeutically effective. Nine medical centers in Germany participated in the ALL/Caspofungin data analysis, with information being collected between 2006 and 2012. Therapy duration of at least 8 days of treatment with Caspofungin in these patients with suspected invasive fungal disease proved that 95 percent of patients attained efficacy, including those patients who were considered critically ill.

LGM Pharma can assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the API Caspofungin, CAS #162808-62-0 for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e) +A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.

Can Phenytoin Aid the Eyesight of Patients with MS?

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Can Phenytoin Aid the Eyesight of Patients with MSKnown as the brand name anti-epileptic drug Dilantin, Phenytoin has recently piqued the interests of Multiple Sclerosis research and development teams. Study results shared from the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London have been hopeful for patients with MS who were treated with Phenytoin, in response to their cases of acute optic neuritis. While complete data is yet to be shared at the upcoming American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting, information shared thus far has excited R&D folks seeking to ease the burden of optic nerve damage for patients suffering from MS. Over 80 percent of patients with Multiple Sclerosis will experience vision difficulties due to optic nerve conditions, and the possible remedy of Phenytoin is encouraging.

PhenytoinAs an anticonvulsant drug used mainly to treat patients with forms of epilepsy, Phenytoin works by slowing down impulses in the brain which cause seizure activity. Patients enrolled in the aforementioned ground breaking study were all diagnosed with both MS and acute optic neuritis. There were 86 patients enrolled and they were randomly assigned to either the Phenytoin group of 4 milligrams daily or a placebo group. The trial lasted approximately three months, with patients being evaluated via optical coherence tomography. The study participants all received the optical coherence tomography, which measured the thickness of the retina, at the commencement of the study and six months after the conclusion of the trial. Patients were also assessed for general eyesight, including sharpness and color perception. Study results gleaned showed that the patient population who received Phenytoin experienced roughly 30 percent less retinal nerve fiber damage as compared to the placebo group. Additionally, patients who were administered Phenytoin demonstrated a 34 percent higher volume of the macula. After episodes of acute optic neuritis were resolved, study researchers found that the patients who received Phenytoin experienced a return to normal vision. These results have suggested to researchers that Phenytoin holds a viable key to the prevention of nerve damage and blindness in patients with MS. While adverse effects are possible from Phenytoin, such as constipation, nausea and headache, no patients in this study withdrew due to side effects.

Vision difficulties are unfortunately part of the initial signs and symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis, including several distinct types of eye complications:

  • MS Diplopia- also known as the term “double vision”, this eye condition occurs when MS attacks either the cerebellum or brainstem. Patients experience frustration with Diplopia that typically last in bouts of eight weeks. However, some patients can experience this debilitating condition indefinitely.
  • MS Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia-roughly 25 percent of patients diagnosed with MS at a young age experience this vision problem. The hallmark signs of Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia include blurry and/or double vision, dizziness and a feeling of moving when focusing on something stationary. The symptoms tend to last for several weeks before subsiding, although a small number of patients, particularly those people with a very progressive form of MS may experience relapses often.
  • MS Nystagmus- as the most commonly reported eye condition in patients with Multiple Sclerosis, Nystagmus causes vertigo and blurry vision, which can be persistent for some people.
  • MS Optic Neuritis- this condition is precipitated by inflammation in one or both optic nerves, which is unfortunately a common occurrence for patients with MS. An impairment in seeing colors, blurry vision, peripheral vision loss and pain in the eye are all symptoms of this challenging condition. The vast majority of patients may experience this condition for about six to eight weeks, and return to normal or near-normal vision. A small number of patients who endure Optic Neuritis do experience permanent vision loss, sadly.

The use of Phenytoin for patients with MS who experience vision impairment as a consequence of the disease may indeed be the unexpected solution to this common problem. LGM Pharma can assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the API Phenytoin, CAS # 57-41-0 for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e) +A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.

Long Term Hypertension Leads to Glaucoma and Brinzolamide is a Viable Treatment Option

Friday, May 29th, 2015

Investigative Ophthalmology Visual ScienceA new study published in the January 2015 Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science has shared alarming news regarding patients who suffer from long-term or chronic hypertension. Information gleaned from studies has revealed that people who are diagnosed with hypertension and who do not treat their condition are at a heightened risk for glaucoma. Ophthalmologists and optometrists are advised by many experts to consider their patients’ blood pressure, as well as their intraocular eye pressure when determining the use of both pressure lowering eye drops and potential blood pressure medication recommendations. Brinzolamide, known as the brand name drug Azopt, which is marketed by Alcon, is an effectual therapy for lowering intraocular pressure in patients with either high eye pressure or diagnosed open-angle glaucoma. Brinzolamide ophthalmic suspension 1% works by reducing the production of fluid in the eye, leading to better drainage and lowered pressure. The ability of Brinzolamide to reduce fluid retention also aids the eye in the overall reduction of nerve damage and vision loss due to developing or diagnosed glaucoma.

hypertension

Adverse effects from Brinzolamide are extremely uncommon. Side effects reported include a mild taste perversion and slight blurriness in vision. The recommended dose of Brinzolamide is one drop in each affected eye, three times daily. Patients with contact lenses are not exempt from using Brinzolamide, however it is suggested that at least 15 minutes pass after the administration of the eye drop dosage before placing contacts back in. The drops should never be administered with contact lenses in the eye. Additionally, if other eye drops are being administered there should be at least a 10 minute waiting period before or after the administration of Brinzolamide.

BrinzolamideClinical studies, pre and post marketing, have shown an average 15 percent reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients who are dosed with Brinzolamide as monotherapy. As a leading cause of blindness worldwide, Glaucoma is a serious issue for a plethora of patients. The new data gleaned, which suggests hypertension as a clear risk factor for glaucoma is concerning to practitioners, especially with the uptick in hypertension in younger adults around the globe. The obesity crisis worldwide has led many adults, both young and old to conditions like hypertension, due to poor eating habits and a lack of regular exercise. The need for greater options for these patients to prevent and treat glaucoma is abundantly clear. LGM Pharma can assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the API Brinzolamide, CAS #138890-62-7 for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e) +A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.

Luliconazole a Gold Standard Treatment for Fungal Infections

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Luliconazole CAS 187164-19-8Known as the brand name azole antifungal cream Luzu, which is marketed by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, Luliconazole 1% cream remains a gold standard treatment for a variety of fungal infections. Luliconazole is approved by the FDA to treat the following:

  • interdigital tinea pedis, or athlete’s foot
  • tinea corporis, also known as ringworm
  • tinea cruris, coined jock itch

As the first topical antifungal agent approved to treat tinea corporis and tinea cruris with a once daily treatment regimen lasting only a week, Luliconazole works quickly and effectively. Luliconazole is equally as effectual for treating interdigital tinea pedis, however the recommended dosage is one application daily for two weeks’ time. The original FDA approval in early 2013 was based on three successful trials which involved 679 adults suffering from tinea pedis and or tinea cruris. The first two trials focused on patients with tinea pedis, with the study goal being a complete clearance of the fungal infection at the four week mark. Trial group #1 demonstrated that 26 percent of patients treated with Luliconazole, once a day for two weeks, had a complete recovery and showed no signs of fungal infection. Only 2 percent of the placebo group in trial group #1 recovered. Trial group #2, which also focused on patients with tinea pedis, showed that 14 percent of patients experienced total healing after two weeks therapy versus 3 percent of the placebo group. The third group of patients with tinea cruris were assessed three weeks post-treatment for complete clearance of their fungal infection. A healthy 21 percent of participants experienced a total recovery with no signs of the fungal infection after just one week. Only 4 percent of the placebo group, however, showed complete clearance at the three week mark. Adverse effects were nonexistent, with a slight number of patients complaining about mild application site irritation.

As a safe and efficacious topical treatment for fungal infections Luliconazole continues to succeed in post marketing studies. Luliconazole works by blocking fungal ergosterol biosynthesis through the inhibition of the lanosterol demethylase enzyme. While this therapy is administered topically some systemic absorption has been documented, with plasma levels ranging from approximately 1 to 7 ng/mL.

LGM Pharma can assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the API Luliconazole CAS# 187164-19-8 for research and development purposes. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process.

Products currently covered by valid US Patents are offered for R&D use in accordance with 35 USC 271(e) +A13(1). Any patent infringement and resulting liability is solely at buyer risk.