Chemical entities SHINE in the top 10 fastest-growing drugs of 2016

Global pharmaceutical companies are increasingly focusing on the development of new biologics. In fact, in 2016, nine out of the top 15 pharmaceutical drugs by sales were of biologic origin. This makes us wonder what the future holds for manufacturers specializing in drugs that originate from chemical synthesis.

This week, PharmaCompass continued its analysis of the top pharma drugs by sales to evaluate the drugs that registered large sales growth in 2016.

Please note that these are not the top-selling drugs, but are the top 10 drugs that registered the maximum growth in global sales over 2015.

Interestingly, things didn’t appear that bad for drugs originating from chemical synthesis — while the top two drugs on the list were biologics, the remaining originated from chemical synthesis.

Here’s a list of drugs that witnessed the largest sales growth in 2016:

1. Opdivo (nivolumab) – Bristol-Myers Squibb

2016 sales: US$ 3,774 million

2015 sales: US$ 942 million

Sales growth: US$ 2,832 million

First approved in 2014, Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Opdivo and Merck’s Keytruda — also known as checkpoint inhibitors — continued to stay on track to be among the top 20 best-selling drugs in the world by 2020. They represent the hot new field of immunotherapy and are known to have given 90-year old Jimmy Carter (former President of the United States) hope in his fight against cancer.

With a sales growth of US$ 2.832 billion, Opdivo registered the highest sales growth of any single drug in 2016. However, Bristol-Myers Squibb received a nasty surprise last year when Opdivo did not demonstrate the desired slowdown in the progress of advanced lung cancer in a trial, as compared to conventional chemotherapy.

While Bristol-Myers’ stock price plunged on this news, Merck announced that not only did Keytruda succeed in a clinical trial as an initial treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but patients actually lived longer. Although Keytruda did not make it to our list of top 10 drugs by sales growth in 2016, it did register a sales increase of US$ 836 million, as its sales grew from US$ 566 million to US$ 1,402 million.

2. Humira (adalimumab) – AbbVie

2016 sales: US$ 16,078 million

2015 sales: US$ 14,012 million

Sales growth: US$ 2,066 million

Abbvie’s Humira (adalimumab) juggernaut continued as it not only remained the best-selling drug in the world, but also added another US$ 2 billion to its 2015 sales by generating record sales of US $16.078 billion in 2016.

Last year, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Amgen’s Amjevita™ (adalimumab – atto) — a biosimilar of Humira®. Therefore, it remains to be seen if Humira will be able to sustain the momentum. Amjevita was approved for treating adults with a variety of medical conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, plaque psoriasis, to ulcerative colitis.

3. Epclusa (sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) – Gilead

2016 sales: US$ 1,752 million (new launch)

Gilead’s third sofosbuvir-based regimen — Epclusa (sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) was approved by the US FDA in June 2016. It is the first and only all-oral, pan-genotypic single tablet regimen for chronic Hepatitis C virus infection. While Epclusa registered an impressive start, Gilead’s other two sofosbuvir-based treatments — Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) and Harvoni (sofosbuvir and lepidasvir) — saw their combined sales decline by almost US$ 6 billion.

4. Imbruvica (ibrutinib) — Johnson & Johnson / AbbVie

2016 sales: US$ 3,083 million

2015 sales: US$ 1,443 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,640 million

Abbvie’s 2015 US$ 21 billion buy of Pharmacyclics seems to be paying off. The Pharmacyclics buy was a way to get access to Imbruvica (ibrutinib), a cancer drug which is co-marketed with Johnson & Johnson. It generated sales of US$ 3.083 billion in 2016. Imbruvica works by blocking a specific protein called Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). In December 2011, Johnson & Johnson said it would pay Pharmacyclics as much as US$ 975 million to fund getting the drug to market in exchange for half the profits generated globally.

5. Eliquis (apixaban) – Bristol-Myers Squibb / Pfizer

2016 sales: US$ 3,342 million

2015 sales: US$ 1,860 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,483 million

Although apixaban was the third-to-market novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC), which is co-promoted by Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb as Eliquis, it continues to unseat Johnson & Johnson’s Xarelto (rivaroxaban) as the leader in its class based on total prescriptions. Rivaroxaban’s total 2016 sales were US$ 5.392 billion.

While Pfizer’s reports its sales as part of Alliance revenues, and exact sales are not known, Bristol-Myers Squibb results alone put Eliquis in the top 10 list. Generics are hot on their tail as, last month, Pfizer and Bristol-Myers’ filed suits against 16 generic makers to uphold their patents for apixaban.

6. Genvoya (elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, tenofovir alafenamide) — Gilead

2016 sales: US$ 1,484 million

2015 sales: US$ 45 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,439 million

Genvoya has been the most successful HIV treatment launch since the introduction of Atripla (the first single-tablet regimen launched a decade ago). Gilead is the dominant HIV player in the US market and has the top three most-prescribed HIV regimens in the US.

Genvoya adds Tenofovir Alafenamide (TAF) to already known treatments. TAF based drugs have demonstrated a better safety profile. They would also allow Gilead to maintain its dominance in the HIV market.

7. Ibrance (palbociclib) — Pfizer

2016 sales: US$ 2,135 million

2015 sales: US$ 723 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,412 million

Discovered in Pfizer laboratories and approved by the US FDA in February 2015, Ibrance is used in combination with Letrozole as a first-line treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+/HER2-) metastatic breast cancer.

8. Triumeq (abacavir, dolutegravir, lamivudine) – GlaxoSmithKline

2016 sales:US$ 2,151 million

2015 sales: US$ 905 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,246 million

GlaxoSmithKline’s HIV drugs business — ViiV Healthcare — has been enjoying sales growth with the introduction of Triumeq ® in its portfolio. While GSK is the major shareholder in ViiV Healthcare, Pfizer and Shionogi also have a stake. Triumeq® is the company’s first fixed-dose combination tablet for a once-daily single pill regimen that combines dolutegravir, an integrase inhibitor, with the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors — abacavir and lamivudine.

9. Revlimid (lenalidomide) – Celgene

2016 sales: US$ 6,974 million

2015 sales: US$ 5,801 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,173 million

Celgene’s Revlimid (lenalidomide) — a thalidomide-derivative introduced in 2004 as an immunomodulatory agent for the treatment of various cancers such as multiple myeloma — brought in US$ 5.8 billion in 2015, and grew another 20 percent this year, to US $6.974 billion. Revlimid now contributes more than 60 percent to Celgene’s total sales of US$ 11.229 billion.

10. Xarelto (rivaroxaban) – Johnson & Johnson (US) and Bayer

2016 sales: US$ 5,392 million

2015 sales: US$ 4,255 million

Sales growth: US$ 1,137 million

Bayer’s Xarelto, which is promoted by Johnson & Johnson in the United States, provided patients with an alternative to the old-guard therapy — warfarin. While rivaroxaban is competing with other novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) like Eliquis (apixaban) and Pradaxa (dabigatran), rivaroxaban has the class lead in indications.

Xarelto recently posted positive results in a large-scale Phase 3 study —COMPASS, involving 27,402 patients, that assessed the effect of the blood thinner in preventing major adverse cardiac events (MACE).

The trial was stopped a year early on the advice of an independent Data Monitoring Committee, after the primary endpoint of prevention of MACE (which includes cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke) reached its pre-specified criteria for superiority over aspirin.

Our view

In QuintilesIMS Institute’s new annual drug spending report, analysts have forecasted that over the coming five years the industry should continue to receive 40 to 45 new drug approvals every year.

A quarter of all the drugs in late-stage development are now focused on oncology. The rate of oncology drug development has hit such a rapid pace that new drugs are superseding old ones in a matter of a few years.

It’s clear that this compilation will see radical changes next year. However, with eight out of the 10 fastest-selling drugs coming from chemical synthesis, traditional generic manufacturers still have a lot of opportunities to explore.

 

Article credit: https://www.pharmacompass.com/radio-compass-blog/chemical-entities-shine-in-the-top-10-fastest-growing-drugs-of-2016

Eteplirsen Granted FDA Accelerated Approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Eteplirsen CAS# 1173755-55-9 (marketed as Exondys 51) injection, the first drug approved to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Exondys 51 is specifically indicated for patients who have a confirmed mutation of the dystrophin gene amenable to exon 51 skipping, which affects about 13 percent of the population with DMD.

“Patients with a particular type of Duchenne muscular dystrophy will now have access to an approved treatment for this rare and devastating disease,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “In rare diseases, new drug development is especially challenging due to the small numbers of people affected by each disease and the lack of medical understanding of many disorders. Accelerated approval makes this drug available to patients based on initial data, but we eagerly await learning more about the efficacy of this drug through a confirmatory clinical trial that the company must conduct after approval.”

DMD is a rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle deterioration and weakness. It is the most common type of muscular dystrophy. DMD is caused by an absence of dystrophin, a protein that helps keep muscle cells intact. The first symptoms are usually seen between three and five years of age, and worsen over time. The disease often occurs in people without a known family history of the condition and primarily affects boys, but in rare cases it can affect girls. DMD occurs in about one out of every 3,600 male infants worldwide. Read Article

Carbapenems API’s for Antibiotic Resistance

A new publication is out called “May 19, 2016 – Tackling Drug-Resistant Infections Globally: final report and recommendations” and it highlights the antibiotic-resistant infections which are being seen for the 1st time in the U.S.

The review says “superbugs” could kill 10 million people each year and cost the world $100 trillion in lost economic output by 2050.

For the first time, a 49-year-old woman in Pennsylvania was infected with an E. coli which carried a gene for resistance against the drug colistin. She was successfully treated with an antibiotic. But, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says “Antibiotic resistance is exploding in numbers as well as severity and the trends are alarming”. Read Article

Alendronate: Helping Bones Get Stronger

Osteoporosis, Paget’s Disease and Alendronate

Alendronate-CAS-66376-36-1As part of the of drug family called bisphosphonates alendronate sodium works by increasing the thickness of bone by slowing down the cells that usually break down bone. This allows the cells that build bone to work more efficiently. Alendronate can help to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis-related fractures by making bones stronger.

Most patients can expect to see an increase in bone density after 3 months. Alendronate can help treat and prevent osteoporosis as long as it is taken consistently. Alendronate controls but does not cure osteoporosis and Paget’s disease of bone, but instead slows down the progression of these conditions.

Short-term use of Alendronate

In results from the Fracture Intervention Trial Long-term Extension (FLEX) study published in 2006 suggests that some women can eventually stop or take a break from taking Alendronate. That study included women who had taken Alendronate for at least five years. The participants were randomly assigned to continue the drug or switch to a placebo for five more years. Individuals who discontinued use showed a slow decline in bone density and a moderate increase in the risk for spine fractures. The rate of hip fracture, a far more serious injury, was the same in the both groups. Therefore, Alendronate treatment significantly reduced the incidence of injury and hospitalizations. Read Article

How Acamprosate Helps Avoid Relapse During Alcohol Rehabilitation

acamprosateThe drug Acamprosate, sold as Campral®, is used (in combination with counseling) to help people recovering from alcoholism to avoid drinking alcohol again. It reduces alcohol consumption in animal models of alcohol addiction.

When a person has been drinking large amounts of alcohol for a long time, it changes the way their brain works. The changes that occur involve two specific neurotransmitters called glutamate and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid). In a healthy brain, glutamate is released in order to encourage more rapid communication between nerve cells called neurons, while GABA is released to slow communication between the brain’s neurons. When alcohol abuse happens, the levels of neuron-exciting glutamate rise, while levels of neuron-calming GABA falls. This leads to overstimulation of the brain and an increased urge for alcohol.

Acamprosate is considered a safe and well-tolerated treatment for most patients with alcoholism. It also appears to help patients remain abstinent. This compound is a featured product for neuroscience research. In a recent article on the Journal of American Medical Association discussed a study on Acamprosate to determine its significance in helping people recovering from alcoholism. It included a systematic review and meta-analysis of the benefits for adults with alcohol use disorders. In the final analysis, Acamprosate was shown to be effective in helping people reduce their return to abusing alcohol.

Acamprosate works by helping restore normal brain function of people who have consumed large amounts of alcohol. It works by restoring the chemical balance in the brain in an individual who has recently stopped drinking.

Acamprosate and R&D

Acamprosate does not prevent the withdrawal symptoms that a recovering individual may experience when they stop drinking alcohol. Acamprosate helps to prevent a person from drinking alcohol only as long as they take it. A benefit of Acamprosate is that it will not cause an unpleasant reaction if alcohol is consumed during treatment.

LGM Pharma can assist clients as a supplier/distributor of the Acamprosate CAS# 77337-76-9. Clients can be assured of quality API products and continuous support throughout the R&D process. We specialize in supplying our customers with a wide range of APIs supported by integrated technical capabilities and access to complete regulatory DMF documentation, suitable for various R&D stages through commercial formulation production, to various global pharmaceutical companies and academic research institutes.